Employers take note! A Court held an employer’s ignorance of a higher minimum wage set by local ordinance can constitute a “willful failure to pay”, resulting in waiting time penalties. California courts are permitted to award an employee a waiting time penalty (of up to 30 days’ worth of the employee’s wages), if the employer

In Scott v. Gino Morena Enterprises, the Ninth Circuit clarifies that the statute of limitations period for filing a Title VII suit commences after the EEOC issues a right-to-sue notice.

Plaintiff Scott sued her employer in federal court, alleging sexual harassment and retaliation at a barbershop at Camp Pendleton where she worked. She brought suit

The California Supreme Court’s ruling this morning in Alvarado v. Dart Containers may have many employers scrambling to verify their overtime pay calculations. The Court rejected Dart’s complicated overtime calculations, which utilized a multiplier of 0.5 instead of 1.5, and which, in calculating the “regular rate” of pay to determine overtime pay, used a divisor

The NLRB flip-flops again. After less than 3 months, the test as to whether the 2 or more entities will be deemed joint employers is back to the 2015 standard announced in the Board’s Browning-Ferris decision. Just in December 2017, the Board overruled Browning-Ferris in a 3-2 decision, Hy-Brand, which requires a showing that

While still new enough that most employers don’t yet know what a “PAGA” claim is, a claim under PAGA (the four letter acronym for Private Attorney General Act) can indeed be a curse to those employers unlucky enough to have made its acquaintance. You see, under the Labor Code PAGA, aggrieved employees are allowed to

Employers, it’s time to pull out the drafting pen and make an important change to your job application forms. Almost all job applications ask for basic information, including the applicant’s education and job history.  Under job history, application forms usually seek the names of prior employers, positions held, dates of employment, and salary history. But

Under the New Parent Leave Act, employees who work for a company with 20 or more employees within a 75-mile radius may take up to 12 weeks of job-protected leave to bond with a new child within one year of the child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement.  To qualify for leave,  employees must have

California employers who share or interchange employees with another employer should know about the joint employer doctrine and its potential impact on an employer’s status as a “joint employer” for leave of absence purposes under the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) and federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

A private employer is covered under